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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
were extraordinarily successful. archives began to open for western scholars. i worked a lot in russia during the 1990's, and i began to have the impression one of the other reasons they were open is because russians were so preoccupied with other things they did not care. as a young american woman, how could you beat walking around those archives? the idea was, she wants to look at those documents, so what? we are busy reforming our country. in 2000 putin became president of russia, and he became conscious of what history was told and how it was being told, and this trickle-down. he became more wary about what archives were opened and who had access to information. they are not totally closed, and you can still work in them. some of them become difficult, particularly the military archives. >> w bush came into the presidency. he made it difficult to get some for you could get access to his father. what is the difference between that attitude and what you have in these countries? is it a matter of degree, or do we have a different attitude? >> we believe in principle it should be open,
or three books and notepad and if for instance it is the week before the invasion of russia, mid june of 1941, i've got all the diaries piled up next to one chair, another of all the recollections, speeches churchill may have made, telegrams to roosevelt, warnings to stalin. and i approached it and i told bill phillips this -- host: your editor? guest: yes, my editor bill tphreupls. as if i was making a quilt. and i think this got a little off in the "new york times" artic article, that i would focus on that story that week, the invasion of russia. well, there was always something else happening that week, too. now we've two or three stories that have to be intertwined and i can't go down too far in the road to august of 1941 with the russian front and ca come all the way back to june 20 then go down to august with the african front. it wouldn't work. so, a read a lot. i bought harriman's memoirs. bill man westchester, in his notes, would xerox a page and cut out a little paragraph and 50 pages later you may find another paragraph from harriman's family worries but there was no contex
, it is the week before the invasion of russia, june 1941, i have all the diaries piled up next to one share. all of the recollections, the speeches churchill may have made, the telegrams to roosevelt, the warnings to stalin -- i approached it and i told bill phillips -- >> as your editor. >> my editor, bill phillips, as if i was making a quilt. this got a little off in the " new york times" article, but focusing on that week, the invasion of russia, there is always something else happening that week, so now we have two or three stories that have to be intertwined, and you cannot go too far down the road into august with the russian front and then come all the way back to june 20 again and then go all the way down to august with the african front and -- it would not work. so i read a lot. i bought the memoirs. bill manchester in his notes had xeroxed a page and cut out a paragraph. 50 pages later you might find another paragraph from the memoirs. but there is no contrast -- what team before and what came afterward. clearly bill wanted to paraphrase something from that excerpt, which kind of point
in southern russia of some significance in 1774. so there must of had a lot of troops left over. they were approached obviously early in 1775. by june 1775, there is a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown was tried to hire russians. and they thought that -- that they had arranged, but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775, partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. and they were not fond of the notion of letting troops to go through german territory. at any event, it did not happen. after that, they had to turn to there werens -- the haiti about 50,000 german mercenaries, not all of the same time. >> i am jumping here, but, in the end, why do the patriots win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british from the start, the logistics' were enormously difficult, the number of the ships they needed, the number of troops. they did not have them. but even more than that, you had 13 colonies, large population, a number of them -- they had a lot of people who fought in previous wars. the british were not able to
occasionally to rent out. they had a war in southern russia of some significance in 1774, so they must of had a lot of troops left over that they had organized for that. they were approached early in 1775. by june of 1775 there's a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown is trying to hire russians. they thought they had it arranged, but it's all part then -- but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775 partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. there were not friendly to the notion of letting troops go through german territory. in any event, it did not happen. after that, they had returned to the hessians. they came from a number of german states. probably a total of 50,000 german mercenaries during the revolution all and all. >> in the end, why did the colonists or why did the patriots went? -- win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british. from the british the logistics were enormously difficult. the number of ships they needed, the number of troops, but did not have them. even more than that, you had 13 colo
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)